Change of Address for Katlynn Brooke Blog

If you have subscribed to the Katlynn Brooke blog….

The address has changed location to http://katlynnbrooke.com/blog/ where you will see all my new posts and updates.

I will automatically subscribe you to my new blog if you have not already done so, but if you do not wish me to, please let me know through “contact”, or you can simply unsubscribe.

Also, on this new Katlynn Brooke site, you have the option to subscribe to my free novella, The People of the Damned. It is the backstory on two of my characters in the Ialana Series, Holgar and Adne. It will automatically sign you up to receive my newsletter as well.

There will no longer be blogs on this site. Thank you for your support, and I hope you will enjoy my blogs on the new location as much as this one.

New Map of Ialana

I have always used a hand-drawn, black and white map for the books in my Ialana Series, but now I have a beautiful, professionally rendered color map for my website, and a  black and white version for my books!

I know that readers of fantasy love maps as much as I do, and how important it is to have a great map, so I hope you will enjoy seeing it on my site in color, and the better B&W one in my books, as soon as I can get it done. You may have to buy the box set that will be coming out this year, but for now, you can see both of them below:

The Continent of Ialana
The Continent of Ialana by Misty Beee for Katlynn Brooke.
The Continent of Ialana
The Continent of Ialana by Misty Beee for Katlynn Brooke.

Season’s Greetings!

Christmas Tree In Snowy Night

This year, our holiday season on the East Coast looks nothing like the above picture. The temperatures are more like that of early spring, and even the flowers and insects are confused. I imagine there are going to be many disappointed children, too, but there is a solution.

Untether your imaginations! Let it roam free with a good book. For myself, I would prefer an amazing fantasy, perhaps even re-reading some of my old favorites, such as The Hobbit, or Lord of the Rings.  Or, one can find books that have wintry, snowy settings, such as Frozen, Harry Potter books, or anything by Robin Hobb in her Fitz and the Fool series.

For those who don’t mind a Christmas devoid of the white stuff, but love to get lost in a good fantasy book, the choices are endless. It can be confusing, too. There are so many books out there to choose from, so many genres and new authors popping up all the time. Sometimes we are afraid to try a new author, a new series, or something that has not yet been tested by the general public.

As an avid reader myself, I can fully understand how one may not wish to veer from the popular literature out there. But I take my hat off to those who are not afraid to give a new author a chance! After all, it takes a brave soul to plow through books that are badly written, boring, or unedited.

You won’t encounter any of that in my books. Since I am a reader too, and have been ever since I learned to read at age 5, I understand what readers want. More importantly, I understand what it is you don’t want to see in a book.

So give the Ialana Series a shot. The first book in the series, The Six and the Crystals of Ialana, will introduce you to the characters and the setting in a way that will hold your interest to the end. I can promise that the action never lags, the plot will intrigue and it will, by the end, leave you wanting more.

In The Six and the Gardeners of Ialana, the Six continue with their adventures, picking up where they left off, but with an entirely new plot. Each book in the series is a complete book, so you will never be left hanging at the end.

In early 2016 (a few weeks!) the third in the series, Anwyn of Ialana will be available. This book holds a promise for even more action, many more plot twists, and enough excitement to keep you glued to your Kindle or Nook. Or, if you prefer, these books are also available in paperback. Now is a good time to catch up with this series, and I hope you will get as much enjoyment out of them as I did writing them.

Merry Christmas to my new readers, and have an enjoyable and wonderful New Year, snow or no snow.

Katlynn Brooke

 

via Search.

What If…

Katlynn Brooke

Man particle and cosmological  physics

How do you see the universe? What if reality was subjective? One of the definitions of subjective is “Proceeding from or taking place within an individual’s mind such as to be unaffected by the external world.”
In the Ialana Series I have woven plots and characters in and out of that definition. My characters, or at least the Six protagonists, must proceed from a place of extreme skepticism—where most of us live most of the time—to a knowing that the nature of reality is really just a magnificent hologram.

It is a matrix that has been created—wait for this—by us. We have all agreed upon what our reality really is, but we have also agreed that it will remain within the natural laws that cannot be broken. For example, we agree on gravity. It works for everyone in the same way.
However, what if one could master one’s hologram and…

View original post 420 more words

What If…

Man particle and cosmological  physics

 

How do you see the universe? What if reality was subjective? One of the definitions of subjective is “Proceeding from or taking place within an individual’s mind such as to be unaffected by the external world.”
In the Ialana Series I have woven plots and characters in and out of that definition. My characters, or at least the Six protagonists, must proceed from a place of extreme skepticism—where most of us live most of the time—to a knowing that the nature of reality is really just a magnificent hologram.

It is a matrix that has been created—wait for this—by us. We have all agreed upon what our reality really is, but we have also agreed that it will remain within the natural laws that cannot be broken. For example, we agree on gravity. It works for everyone in the same way.
However, what if one could master one’s hologram and experience things that others would be afraid to try? Such as mastering gravity. We do it all the time. We have planes. Birds and bugs do it regularly. But what if we all had a built-in spirit-vehicle that is not affected by gravity?
In my series, this is called a Merkaba. Everyone possesses one. Not everyone knows how to use it. In fact, I would say hardly anyone knows how to use it, in and out of the fictional books. I don’t. But my characters want to learn, and learn they do! It doesn’t just happen with a wave of a wand, or a simple belief, but takes years and years of practice.
We have all heard of angels, and how they use their Merkabas to go from their dimension to ours. It does not take a great leap of consciousness to understand that angels are ascended beings who have mastered the nature of reality. Allow your mind to expand even further: that we are all capable of this, if we choose to put the time and effort into it.
For eons, this knowledge has permeated the various religions and cults, but no one seems to have a grip on it, and it is nearly always regarded with great suspicion and antagonism. This knowledge has been obscured, distorted to the point where it no longer seems like something “real”. Mission accomplished. We are confined.
What if we knew—remembered—we had one and how to use it? Some of us, for sure, would use our ability in a way that would not infringe upon the free will of others, but some—many, unfortunately—would use it to gain power and use it for evil. In the Ialana series, the few who know how to use it, use this ability in both ways. It makes for a good story, and goes a step or two beyond the flying broomstick because it also confers invisibility upon the user.
In The Six and the Crystals of Ialana, I introduce the Merkaba, but it is not yet a possibility for our protagonists. In The Six and the Gardeners of Ialana, our protagonists must learn to use theirs but they are not proficient, especially when returning to our reality.

It is only in the third book of the series, Anwyn of Ialana, where the Six are able to use their Merkabas with any kind of proficiency. But so do the bad guys. The very, very bad guys!
Anwyn of Ialana will be published early 2016.

More Than Just a Good Story

Gate to heaven

In The Six and the Crystals of Ialana, one of my characters, a shape-shifter named Irusan, explains his origins:

“Where am I from? It’s a world that co-exists in the same space as this one, but one that no man or beast can see. It’s invisible, much as our sanctuary here is invisible to others. It exists in a frequency zone . . . What is a frequency zone? If you could see what you were made of, you would notice that each particle that makes you you, moves in a certain way. Think of them as extremely small, spherical objects, so small that you can’t see them because your eye can only see things that are larger. If you drew a line through the center of these tiny spherical objects, you would see that some lines, or what we call an axis, runs through the center of each particle vertically, up and down, and the sphere rotates around this invisible line. Sometimes the axis may move to another angle, and the sphere would rotate at this angle, either faster or slower. That is what we call particle spin or frequency. If all of your particles change their spin direction and rotation speed ever so slightly, you disappear, but you will continue to exist, only on another level and in another world. You could even shape shift, as I do.”

Irusan is revealing, in his simple and direct way to a technologically backward people, what we only theorize today as being scientific possibilities: alternate universes, other dimensions.

How would you explain electricity to a stone-age or medieval culture? If you even managed to do so, you would probably be burned as a witch or wizard, or sacrificed at the next full moon.

The theme in the Ialana Series, all three books so far, is to show that even things we would consider magical today are nothing more than an understanding of the laws of the universe–a universe that is more than what the eye can see or that our instruments can measure.

The paragraph above is probably the most complicated one in the book. The rest of it is adventure and intrigue, sprinkled with the knowledge of a more advanced society. A reader will never be bored.

I am sure you will enjoy the first in the series, The Six and the Crystals of Ialana, and from there you will most certainly wish to keep up with the exciting lives of The Six. As a bonus, the first book is still only .99c.

Good News!

FaceCrystalCaveFinal2thumbnail

The new edition (2nd) of the first book in the Ialana Series, has been published in e-book format on Amazon, and Barnes and Noble.  Print-on-demand copies will soon be available on both places. The price is right, the story is spell-binding, and I think the cover is amazing. Please take a look. Read the first chapters, and see what you think.

The second book in the series, The Six and the Gardeners of Ialana, will be re-published in the next 10 days as well on these sites. I think once you have read the first book, you won’t be disappointed, and will definitely want to read the next one!

The third in the series, Anwyn of Ialana, will be published in early 2016. I can’t wait.

To buy:

Amazon: myBook.to/thesix

http://www.amazon.com/Six-Crystals-Ialana-Book-ebook/dp/B00N42SCDS

Barnes and Noble: http://tiny.cc/lcl85x

How Much Daydreaming is too Much?

FairyLightSm

As a child in school, I spent hours wool-gathering during classes. Many teachers despaired for my academic future, and I would get comments on my report cards such as, “Dreams too much.” That one is actually a verbatim comment.

How much daydreaming is too much?

To be sure, daydreaming hampered my ability to understand algebra and trigonometry, but in hindsight, I feel that even had I paid attention I would not have understood these subjects. The part of the brain that understands mathematic formulas and figures dropped out of school before it even began, at the kindergarten level. Instead, its cousin, the part of the brain that could read well and make pictures in my head went into overdrive. If there was an academic award for imagination, I would have aced it.

My English teachers loved me. I wrote essays, short stories and compositions, that were read out loud to the rest of the class. It did not make me popular, but my reputation was always redeemed again during arithmetic and math classes. But this was where I earned the scorn and fury of teachers. We did not have great teachers, obviously (unless they taught English). It was the 1950’s and ‘60’s, and corporal punishment was encouraged. I had been whacked with rulers and hit by flying erasers or chalk too many times to count. None of it helped me understand math. My parents weren’t sympathetic. (But that is another blog for later–about the ’50’s: “What was it really like?“)

I didn’t like science much. Too many facts and figures, not to mention the gross smells. Science class turned into a mad scientist’s lab, and I conjured up visions of monsters being created. Maybe this is where Mary Shelley got her inspiration from for her novel, Frankenstein. It’s probably where I got my monsters from for my fantasy novels.

My math teachers were monsters with claws and big teeth. I was always the heroine who rescued my fellow-students from the hideous creature that drooled and roared up at the chalk-board.

Daydreaming was my escape. There is a saying, one man’s day dream is another man’s novel. Since I knew I’d never grow up to be a scientist or engineer, or even an astronaut, I felt it wasn’t a waste of my time to daydream during class. It has paid off. Unfortunately, not in money. If money is your thing, aim for the astronaut or engineer, or even the burger flipper at the local fast food joint. With the latter, you might still make more money than the average author.

But if it is your dream to write books, and I mean books of fiction, then there is no need to feel inferior to your fact-based friends. I must just caution you, be smarter than I was about your daydreaming. Teachers no longer physically assault students, but they can still write sarcastic comments in your report card. Pay attention. Try to understand the incomprehensible, and work around it. Find a time to daydream where it will not cause problems for you.

Academia is important to all of us, especially writers. We want to be able to understand the incomprehensible just as much as anyone because you never know when you may need it in a novel you are writing. Being smart makes you a better writer! One can have the most amazing inspiration for an excellent story, but being unable to translate that into something someone wants to read requires work. It requires a basic or better understanding of language, syntax, grammar and spelling. Don’t let yourself down on these subjects.

Writer’s Block–How to Deal With It?

WritersBlock

If you haven’t experienced writer’s block, then perhaps you just don’t write a lot, if at all, and then you probably would not even be reading this blog or this post. Every writer, at some point, suffers the mind-numbing and discouraging affliction called writer’s block. What is it? It is when you sit down in front of your keyboard fully intending to write the next chapter of your book, and . . .  nothing, nada. Not a word or even a half-baked idea comes to mind. It can strike at any time, but usually when you least expect it.

What can we do? Besides crying, staring blankly at the screen, or pounding something in frustration, there are fortunately many things that can clear writer’s block. Maybe not all of them all of the time, but keep at it, and eventually you’ll hit upon something that does the trick.

  • I stop trying to write. “Trying to” only makes it worse. It’s like pushing a wet noodle, so stop. Get up and get a drink or a snack. Go for a walk. Pet the dog, or the cat. Talk to a plant. It doesn’t really matter what you do, as long as it has nothing to do with your writing project or book. Don’t linger here too long though. Now, go back and sit in front of that keyboard again.
  • Read what you’ve already written. If it’s a book, start from the beginning and read it through to where you got to in your last session. If it’s not yet a book but a compilation of ideas, or a rough outline, read that too. As you’re reading, keep a pen and paper handy and jot down any thoughts that come to you, no matter how silly they may sound. Read what you have written as if it is someone else’s project or book, not yours. Pretend that a friend asked you for writing advice and presented you with what is in front of you. When we stop pressuring ourselves to be perfect, we open up our creative mind to fresh ideas that don’t have to be perfect to pass the mind-police road block in your head.
  • Talk to other writers. This is not too difficult if you belong to a writer’s group, whether on-line or in person. We all go through this at some point and we’ve all discovered ways that might work for us. It’s good to share your feelings with others who might be able to help.
  • Go read another book in your genre. Read what inspires you. If Tolkien is your inspiration, or Stephen King, find a book of their’s that you really enjoyed. Read a chapter or two. By the time you have finished you will understand more of what your own goals are for your book. Notice how they write and ask yourself if a certain passage inspires you to write in a similar style or gives you any ideas. We are not copy-cats, but we can find a lot of inspiration from other authors. Sometimes, even an author you don’t like. Why don’t you like them? What is it about their books that you feel you can do better? This may help you realize that you are able to do much better, and that might help clear the block too.
  • If you don’t know how to meditate and have never done it, don’t worry—it’s easy. Go sit somewhere quiet and close your eyes. Make your mind as blank as it can get, but if you are having trouble doing this, imagine you are sitting in a place that you love and feel at peace. For example, I would choose a beach. I would hear the waves breaking on the shore and feel the warm sun on my body. I would hear sea-gulls cries around me. Engage all your senses. Do this for as long as it feels real to you, and if you happen to fall asleep, that’s okay too. Your mind block will clear itself out of the way as you snooze. Or maybe a sea-gull will sit down next to you and tell you how to proceed. Don’t laugh, it can happen!

By now you have probably gathered that the solution to writer’s block is not to resist it. Fear causes writer’s block. A deep-rooted fear that we’re not good enough and ideas are limited. We live in an unlimited universe, and there are more ways of saying things out there than there are people currently writing. Allow your mind to explore without fear attached and it will find the most creative things to say! If it doesn’t happen in five minutes, it is not a tragedy. It will happen, and you will know that all you were doing was waiting for the right thing to come along. Sometimes, the longer we spend away from our book, the more able we are to come at it again with a fresh mind. If you can’t write that day, not at all, then try again the next day.